SPWLA Kuwait 2009/2010

   December 2009

Technical meeting 1 (2009/2010)
Tuesday 8th December 2009
Sponsor – Kuwait Oil Company
Location Hilton Hotel


Taher M. N. EL Gezeery (KOC, West Kuwait) "Utilizing Advanced Technologies in Horizontal Drilling, Mishrif Reservior, Minagish Field, West Kuwait"

We are pleased to announce that over 40 people attended the 8th December 2009 meeting of the Kuwait Chapter of the Society of Professional Well Log Analysts (SPWLA) - dedicated to fostering interest in Petrophysical matters and encouraging the exchange of experience within our local Petrophysical community. We now have 160 registered Members of the Kuwait Local Chapter of the SPWLA.

Prior to the Talk, the president briefed the audience with last session achievements, before introducing the speaker.

Taher has more than 23 years of oil industry experience in middle east, out of which 11 years were with Gulf of Suez Petroleum Co., Egypt, and 12 years with Kuwait Oil Company (KOC), Kuwait. Taher's main specialty is in Carbonate Sedimentology, Petrophysics, Sequence stratigraphic interpretation, Chemostratigraphy, Depositional and diagenetic interpretation, Litho-facies and rock typing, Structural Geology, Geophysics, Fault and fracture analysis, and 3D reservoir modelling. Taher is a member of many professional societies such as AAPG, SPE, and SPWLA, and has published several papers.

This talk described how Logging While Drilling (LWD) and Chemostratigraphy can be used to identify the different mechanical layers real time within the Mishrif reservoir and establish the relationship between the fracture corridors and the intersected faults in drilling the longest horizontal well in Kuwait.

The talk did spark a lot of interest in the audience as using chemostratigraphy to help steer drilling is not commonly used in Kuwait. Several interesting questions were put to the speaker during the question session.

After the talk the members had dinner where the discussion continued.


Profile

Name: Taher M. N. El Gezeery
Title: Senior Geologist
Department: Field Development- West Kuwait- Minagish Field

Taher El-Gezeery is a senior development geologist with more than 23 years of experience in the Middle East, out of which 11 years were with Gulf of Suez Petroleum Co., Egypt, and 12 years with Kuwait Oil Company (KOC), Kuwait. Taher's main specialty is in Carbonate Sedimentology, Petrophysics, Sequence stratigraphic interpretation, Chemostratigraphy, Depositional and diagenetic interpretation, Litho-facies and rock typing, Structural Geology, Geophysics, Fault and fracture analysis, and 3D reservoir modelling. Taher is a member of many professional societies such as AAPG, SPE, and SPAWLA, and has published several papers. In addition, Taher represented KOC in many regional and international conferences such as GEO, ADIPEC, IPTC and AAPG in Greece.


Utilizing Advanced Technologies in Horizontal Drilling Mishrif Reservoir, Minagish Field, West Kuwait

The Minagish field, in West Kuwait, is a North-South trending asymmetrical anticline, dipping from east to west with hydrocarbons contained in six major reservoirs ranging in age from Early Jurassic to Late Cretaceous. Mishrif is a tight, fractured carbonate reservoir of Upper cretaceous age developed in a shallow marine deposition environment. The average thickness is about 300 ft with an average Net of 170ft in the upper layers. The observed porosity in the upper reservoir layers ranges between 10-30% and permeability measured from vertical wells ranges between 0.001–17 mD. The oil in the Mishrif is highly viscous and production is normally enhanced by fractures in the upper Mishrif layers as they act as the main permeability conduit for the main storage below. The second Mishrif layer unit 2 (M9 & M8) is a fairly high porous peloidal packstone to grainstone sequence that is highly fractured at the upper 15 feet of the layer's "dual porosity system". The fracture corridors within the layer improve permeability, thereby making it a good potential for horizontal well placement. It was impossible to reach the observed production rates from matrix without one or two major fluid conductive fracture corridors. A high geological risk in horizontal drilling is coming from the formation dip uncertainties, which were expected to vary between 2.5- upward up to 4-5 degrees downward, with an intensity increase close to the highly faulted areas. Previous wire line image studies carried out identified these layers and their corresponding fractures, but because most of the studied wells were vertical, the fracture corridors could not be properly related to presence of faults in the field. This paper aims at showing how effective Logging While Drilling (LWD) and Chemostratigraphy were useful in real to/near-real time to identify the different mechanical layers within the Mishrif reservoir and establish the relationship between the fracture corridors and the intersected faults in drilling the longest horizontal well in Kuwait.

   June 2010

IMPORTANCE OF POROUS PLATE MEASUREMENTS ON CARBONATES AT RESERVOIR CONDITIONS

Porous plate method has been used for years in acquiring reliable capillary pressure data, representative of reservoir rock-fluid properties. In recent years, the method has been found to be reliable and subject to less experimental errors and analysis when used for electrical resistivity (RI) measurements as well. A major problem has been the long time scales required for achieving reliable data. This work describes the recent advances made in water-oil capillary pressure measurements in carbonates, that is fundamental to consistent and reliable static models in reservoir engineering. A coherent Sw-RI measurement is the basis of defining reservoir fluid saturations accurately and in validating logs used to interpret these saturations.

The study focused on acquiring reliable and consistent water-oil Pc and Sw-RI measurements on carbonate reservoir cores using a variety of techniques including Porous Plate method, Continuous Injection technique (CI), Centrifuge and Fast Resistivity Index Measurements (FRIM). More than 70 reservoir cores, comprising four different carbonate reservoirs are investigated. The pitfalls of each technique is discussed with the data examined, and a rigorous development of porous plate is presented to capture the important primary drainage, spontaneous imbibition and forced imbibition cycles at reservoir stress conditions and reservoir temperature.


Biography

Moustafa Dernaika is the Regional SCAL Manager at Weatherford Laboratories - Abu Dhabi. He joined ResLab in 2001, which substantially became Weatherford Laboratories in 2007.

Moustafa holds BS and MS degrees from the Middle East Technical University in Ankara, both in Chemical Engineering. He is currently continuing his PhD study in Petroleum Reservoir Engineering at Stavanger University in Norway.

Moustafa has co-authored 10 technical papers on capillary pressure/electrical property measurements and relative permeability.


   May 2010

Rock Mineralogical Analysis Reduces Interpretation Uncertainty: The GEM Tool

One of the most important parameters in understanding tools responses, and in turn provide accurate reservoir evaluation, is to have a clear idea of the mineralogical components of a formation rock. For example; dealing with clay minerals without knowing the type of clay will have a serious effect on the calculated porosity regardless of the sophistication of the software used in the analysis. This is because every clay mineral has a completely different response on the basic logging tools like the neutron, density and sonic. Also, it is known in carbonates and clastics that the existence of some elements provide better identification of the formation permeability which leads to identifications of the thief zones while injection activities.

Therefore, having a tool that accurately determines the yields of the different elemental composition of a rock, on foot-by-foot basis, enables the interpreters to reduce the uncertainty and provide more accurate reservoir and reserve analysis. Some of the values of the having elemental data is to have better estimate of matrix sigma, matrix density and permeability. Field examples and applications from the Middle East using the GEM tool will be presented and discussed.


   March 2010

From Pore to Core: Multi-scale Digital Rock Physics

Gary Sinclair – ME Regional Manager - Ingrain Inc.
Digital Rock Physics has emerged as a valuable tool to provide a deeper understanding of rock properties in challenging reservoirs in a very rapid timeframe.

This technology has wide application, ranging from computation of rock properties and fluid flow characteristics, reservoir rock typing, to improving reservoir simulations. Digital Rock Physics can be used in all reservoir types including; carbonates, sandstones, shales, tight gas sands and oil sands. The technology is routinely used on core samples but is effective on sidewall cores and cuttings because it works with small physical sample sizes.

Digital rock physics utilizes state of the art CT scanning and SEM imaging to capture high-resolution 3D images of the reservoir rock from the whole core at the micron scale down to pores, grains and TOC at the nanometer scale. The 3D image of micro- and nano-scale samples captures the rock fabric, grain structure and pore space geometry at resolutions from 1 micron down to 3 nanometers. Reservoir rock properties are computed directly from these 3D images.

This presentation will include examples of Digital Rock Physics as applied on actual ME reservoirs.


Gary Sinclair - Regional Manager MENA
Gary Sinclair joined Ingrain with over 30 years experience in the core analysis industry. He has worked with Core Laboratories, Fugro Robertson and ResLab, (Weatherford Laboratories) and has been responsible for laboratories in the UK, the Netherlands, Norway, Egypt, and in the Middle East. His major areas of expertise include operations management, optimum core analysis study design, data evaluation and interpretation, project management, training and quality assurance. For the past 12 years he has been working exclusively in the Middle East as Regional Manager for ResLab where he was responsible for the set up and management of core analysis laboratories in Abu Dhabi, Oman and Kuwait.

   January 2010

Technical meeting 2 (2009/2010)
Tuesday 19th January 2010
Sponsor – Baker Hughes
Location Marina Hotel

Dr. Guy Vachon (Technology Director, Baker Hughes) "Reservior Justification of New Completion and Reservoir Monitoring Technologies"

We are pleased to announce that over 50 people attended the 19th January 2010 meeting of the Kuwait Chapter of the Society of Professional Well Log Analysts (SPWLA) - dedicated to fostering interest in Petrophysical matters and encouraging the exchange of experience within our local Petrophysical community. We now have 160 registered Members of the Kuwait Local Chapter of the SPWLA.

Prior to the Talk, the speaker introduced by local chapter secretary

Dr Guy Vachon received his Bachelor's through PhD in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from MIT and MBA from University of Texas at Austin. He worked for Schlumberger from 1984 to 1999 as an engineer and manager. In 1997 he joined the Schlumberger/Baker Intelligent Well Systems joint venture. From 1999 to 2003 he managed Industrial Automation and Technical Data Management Software at National Instruments. In 2003 he joined Baker Oil Tools where he served as Product Line Director for Intelligent Completions and Director of Product Line Strategy. In 2006 he became Director of Optimization Solutions for Baker Hughes and in 2008 became Director of Reservoir Technology. He is currently Director of Enterprise Technology Programs.

This talk described novel smart completion technologies and how can each be used to be better manage reservoirs. Each reservoir provides unique challenge to petroleum engineers. Hence no unique completion technology can provide the answer for all types of reservoirs. Good planning, understanding of the reservoir challenges and selecting of appropriate completion technology can significantly increase production. Several examples were given from the Middle East, showing how different types of completion when properly used increase return on investment.

After the talk the members had dinner where the discussion continued.


Mapping Water Saturation between wells using Crosswell Electromagnetics

Michael Wilt
Schlumberger Regional Technology Center Abu Dhabi UAE
Crosswell Electromagnetics (EM) is a recently developed technology that applies induction EM principles to map electrical resistivity between boreholes spaced up to 1km apart. The technology was initially developed in the US and recently brought to the middle east to map interwell water saturation for management of water floods, locating by passed hydrocarbons and finding interwell oil/water contacts.

In this talk I will briefly describe the principles behind the technology and illustrate its application with a case history from the middle east.

Crosswell resistivity image during water flooding at a middle eastern oil field. Well marked INJ is a horizontal water injector; logs at the margin are water saturation from PNL measurements.


Bio for Michael Wilt

Dr Michael Wilt is a Schlumberger Advisor in Deep Reading Electromagnetic (EM)Technologies and he is stationed at their Regional Technology Center in Abu Dhabi. He received his B.S (1973) and M.S. (1975) in Geophysics from the University of California, Riverside and received his PhD from U.C. Berkeley in 1991 in applied geophysics. He was employed as a staff scientist at Lawrence Berkeley and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories between 1977 and 1997. In 1997 he joined Electromagnetic Instruments Inc (EMI) where he lead research and development projects in crosshole EM and extended induction logging. EMI joined Schlumberger in 2001 and Dr Wilt leads the development effort in deep reading EM technologies, which continues today.